Injection Safety

L’inquiétante pénurie de l’anti-venin FAV-Afrique

C’est un outil précieux que perdront les médecins africains fin 2016. A cette date, les derniers lots de FAV-Afrique, un sérum anti-venin très efficace contre la morsure de serpents, auront été épuisés. Et il n’y aura pas de nouvelle livraison : Sanofi, son inventeur, a arrêté en 2014 la fabrication, faute de clients. « Quand la décision a été prise en 2010, nous ne vendions plus que 5 000 doses contre 30 000 quelques années auparavant », explique Alain Bernal, porte-parole de Sanofi-Pasteur.
 
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Científicos españoles desarrollaron vacuna contra chikungunya

Investigadores del español Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Científicas dicen haber desarrollado una vacuna contra el virus del chikunguña, enfermedad procedente de países tropicales y transmitida por el mosquito tigre, buscan financiación para llevar a cabo los ensayos clínicos.

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Researchers ready consumer STD-detecting, connected ring for Indiegogo in early 2016

An international entrepreneurial trio has developed a hand-worn ring that detects syphilis, gonorrhea, chlamydia and trichomoniasis--wirelessly transmitting the results to a smartphone or tablet in under one minute. Known as Hoope, the device has a retractable needle and an anesthetic system based on electrical pulses; it is slated to debut on crowdfunding site Indiegogo in January.
 
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Meningitis C vaccine shortage prompts fears of major outbreak in Africa

A shortage of meningitis C vaccine is threatening to jeopardise the ability to cope with a potential outbreak of the disease in Africa, international public health organisations, including the World Health Organisation, have warned.
 
A Meningitis A vaccine introduced in 2010, MenAfriVac, has dramatically reduced incidence of that strain but type C infections have been increasing and a cheap equivalent that would protect against meningitis C, among other strains, is still years away.
 
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Call for more weaponry against ‘neglected malaria’

[NEW DELHI] The World Health Organization has called for more research on ways to battle malaria caused by the Plasmodium vivax parasite, in the wake of a surge of infections in Western India.
 
According to the WHO, the parasite is spreading fast in the Indian cities of Ahmedabad, Bikaner and Mumbai. It still kills fewer people than its relation P. falciparum, but is harder to prevent and treat.
“P. vivax is harder to eliminate than P. falciparum due to its relapsing nature.”
 
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OSU researchers point to vaccine-free flu protection

Flu vaccines have grown into a multibillion-dollar business, but researchers at the Ohio State University have published findings that could one day transform the field and put a damper on those figures.
 
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Africa celebrates one year without polio: UN

MOGADISHU: Africa has marked one year since the last case of recorded polio, with the United Nations celebrating today a key step towards eradicating the disease. 
 
The last recorded case on the continent was in Somalia in August 11 2014, although health officials must wait two more years before declaring the continent free from the highly infectious, crippling virus. 
 
The UN children's agency UNICEF, which plays a key role in polio vaccinations, called it an "extraordinary achievement" but warned it was "not an end point." 
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Novavax: Study indicates vaccine effective vs. RSV

Trenton, N.J. — Early research in older adults found an experimental vaccine prevented nearly two-thirds of serious cases of a common, seasonal respiratory virus that annually kills thousands of vulnerable Americans — babies and senior citizens.
 
If further testing by vaccine developer Novavax Inc. goes well, in a few years the biotech company’s genetically engineered shot could become the first vaccine approved against respiratory syncytial virus, or RSV.
 
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New report sheds light on the respiratory syncytial virus (rsv) infections research report - pipeline review, H1 2015

This report provides comprehensive information on the therapeutic development for Respiratory Syncytial Virus (RSV) Infections, complete with comparative analysis at various stages, therapeutics assessment by drug target, mechanism of action (MoA), route of administration (RoA) and molecule type, along with latest updates, and featured news and press releases.

It also reviews key players involved in the therapeutic development for Respiratory Syncytial Virus (RSV) Infections and special features on late-stage and discontinued projects.

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Collaborating with communities to improve vaccine coverage: a strategy worth pursuing?

It is unfortunate but distrust of vaccines remains widespread in the world today. In August 2003, a polio vaccination boycott was declared in the five northern states of Nigeria. Political and religious leaders argued that the vaccines could be contaminated with anti-fertility agents, HIV and cancer-causing agents. It took a full year to resolve the boycott but the one year period wreaked havoc on the status of polio across the world. There were polio outbreaks in three continents during that one year period. It ended up costing public health officials more than US$500.
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