Hepatitis A

WHO welcomes global momentum on viral hepatitis

On World Hepatitis Day, 28 July, WHO welcomes new progress in tackling one of the world’s most serious diseases. Viral hepatitis – a group of infectious diseases known as hepatitis A, B, C, D, and E – affects millions of people worldwide, causing acute and chronic liver disease and killing close to 1.4 million people every year.
 
“For years, viral hepatitis has been largely neglected,” says Dr Margaret Chan, Director-General at WHO. “But now we are beginning to see greater awareness and global momentum building to tackle it.”
 
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WHO in the Western Pacific: Working towards a hepatitis-free Region

Viral hepatitis causes an estimated 1.4 million deaths worldwide each year—which is close to the number of deaths caused by HIV/AIDS, and more than those caused by malaria and tuberculosis. Despite the high burden on individuals, families and societies, political and financial engagement remains inadequate. The World Health Organization (WHO) estimates that more than 500 million people worldwide are affected by chronic hepatitis B and C.
 
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GSK offers five-year price freeze on vaccines for GAVI graduating countries

GlaxoSmithKline announced on May 20 that it will support developing countries that have growing economies by putting a five year freeze on vaccine prices for countries who graduate from GAVI Alliance support.
 
The announcement was made by Andrew Witty, the CEO of GSK, at the GAVI Alliance replenishment launch meeting in Brussels.
 
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Vaccinating Children Beyond the ‘Cold Chain’: Extending the Heat Stability of Vaccines

Shipping and storing vaccines in a ‘cold chain’ in the tropical heat of many resource-limited countries – whereby the vaccine is kept at temperatures between 2°C to 8°C from the point of manufacture until reaching the recipient – is a tremendous challenge and a major cause of poor immunisation coverage rates.
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New vaccine could guard against common birth defect-causing virus

An experimental vaccine using a novel defense mechanism may eventually help protect people from a common virus that affects more than half of the U.S. population and causes congenital birth defects in some cases.
 
Using the most common form of white blood cell, called neutrophils, scientists from Cardiff University have found a way to quell cytomegalovirus, or CMV.
 
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Africa: Croatian Vaccine Manufacturer Faces Uncertain Future

The future of Croatia's Institute of Immunology, which made and exported various vaccines to the developing world, has been questioned by a series of recent events.

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Kyrgyzstan has zero rates on many virus diseases

Zero rates on many virus diseases can be observed in Kyrgyzstan. The Deputy Minister of Health Care Kubanychbek Choibekov stated today at a session of the committee on social policy.

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WHO Executive Board Meeting

Hosted by the World Health Organization (WHO).

From the WHO website:

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‘Remote-controlled’ vaccine delivery could eliminate need for booster jabs

Many vaccines, such as those for Hep A and B, HPV, MMR and rabies, need several booster doses to achieve maximal immunological protection. Booster doses add to the complexity of vaccine administration, especially when used in large vaccination campaigns in the developing world.

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Vaccinations have prevented at least 103 million cases of contagious disease since 1924

Vaccinations have been credited with some of humanity's greatest technological triumphs over disease, including drastically reducing polio around the globe and almost eliminating smallpox entirely. But how many people have been spared life-threatening infections thanks to the introduction of vaccines?

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